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Bruce dawe and judith wright

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J.W. and B.D. both write poetry with universal themes. Coose one poem by each poet. Explain what theme / s each poem. .

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<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#576,9639><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><:f,2Times New Roman,><+">Judith Wright and Bruce Dawe both write poetry with universal themes. Choose one poem by each poet and explain what theme / s each poem conveys<:f><:f,2Times New Roman,> and how these themes are conveyed

<:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>.<:f><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-"><-">

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#288,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>============================================================<-">

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#3168,9639><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0><+"> Australian poets Judith Wright and Bruce Dawe write poems

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>presenting their <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>perspective of live. Their poems are subjective and convey universal theme which men and women can understand<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> and

relate to. In Wright's poem, <+#>Remittance Man<-#>, the universality of the poem is brought out through the events which occur, and the themes which are conveyed. The themes of

<+#>Remittance Man<-#> include the <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>lives of individual nomads,

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>cycle of life<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>,

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>and contrasting of the old world to the new world. These universal themes are conveyed through the tone and poetic techniques Wright has incorporated<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> in the poem. Similarly<-">

<:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> in Dawe's poem, <+#>Drifters<-#>, the universality is brought out through the subject and the themes<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of the poem. The themes of

<+#>Drifters<-#> are <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>the

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>lives of nomadic families,<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> cycle of life,

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>and no permanent place<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>. These universal themes are also conveyed similar to that of

<+#>Remittance Man<-#>, through the persona and the imagery contrasts Dawe has used through the poem.<-"><:f>

<[email protected]><:S+-1><:#2592,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> In the poem <+#>Remittance Man<-#>, the theme of lives of individual<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> nomads is conveyed<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> through the

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>spendthrift, and the tone of the poem. Similarly in the poem,

<+#>Drifters<-#>, the theme of lives of nomadic families is conveyed through the family and Dawe's<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> attitude towards the subject. It is recognised from

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>the tone of the poem, <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>that both poets are sympathetic towards nomads. Wright displays a sympathetic<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> tone in

<+#>Remittance Man<-#>, as it is clear from the last stanza of the poem, "closed its magnificence . . . polished by diligent ants". This line has a lot of emotions incorporated within, and from her selection of words, she is able to produce<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>

a glimmer<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of hope<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> for the remittance man in his after life.

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>Wright has <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>metaphorically implied<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> his sins are cleansed, when<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> the ants are carefully poli

shing his bones,<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> and he will finally rest in peace.

<[email protected]><:S+-1><:#2016,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> Similarly<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> in

<+#>Drifters<-#>, Dawe has also displayed a glimmer<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of hope in the last line of the poem. Dawe has placed it in the last line

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>implying <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>not to give up, because there is always hope of finding a permanent<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> place to live at.<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>

This line is very significant in the poem, as it brings out the hope of every time the family moves to a new place.

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>The tone at the beginning<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of the poem is futile and conceited show the family

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>are<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> upset

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>when they have to move from a place they have adapted and enjoyed.<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> As the poem ends hopeful for every new place, and conceited for every time they have to move, the poem is

a cycle, which inturn brings forward the theme cycle of life.<-"><:f><-#><-#><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0><-#>

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#2880,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> The theme cycle of life is evident in both poems,

<+#>Remittance Man<-#> and <+#>Drifters<-#>. In <+#>Remittance Man<-#>, the spendthrift lives an individual life, and has easily forgotten<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> his past and "took to the life" he presently lived in Australia. He was a wa

nderer and did what ever pleased himself as there was no constraint in his life as he did in England which is visually impacted, in the structure of the poem, where

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>the first stanza is relatively short, as he had lived a constrained life in England and his memories of England<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> are diminishing<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>. In

contrast to stanza 2, there are more lines as it shows the spendthrift has lived most of his life in Australia, and that he has assimilated<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> to the bush life. His days are also long and boring, as illustrated in the

long stanza 2. H<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>is death occurs in stanza 3, and the stanza is relatively the same length as stanza 1 which inturn produces an insight of the cycle of life, the spendthrift has.

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#1440,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> In contrast, <+#>Drifters<-#> starts with a pretentious tone which is evident with the kids response<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of "Truly?". It is clear that it is not a real emotion<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>

experienced because the kids are "wildly excited for no reason". The repetitiveness<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of the word "And. ." also give an insight of a repetitive<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> miserable life. This repetitio

n<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> conveys across the idea of a cycle, which is conveying the theme of the cycle of life.<-"><:f>

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#2592,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> Similar<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> to

<+#>Remittance Man<-#>, the sentences in <+#>Drifters<-#>, are also quite long and some are even broken.

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>These sentences represent the lives of nomads, which can be identified in both poems,

<+#>Remittance Man<-#> and <+#>Drifters<-#>. The long sentences are symbolic to the long tiring days of hard futile work. The end of sentences being broken, show the complex and miserable lives that nomads live. The broken lines represent that even when nom

ads rest or sleep after working hard, their dreams are also broken or interrupted. As there is one continuous stanza in Drifters,

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>one line continuing after another<:f><-#><-#><-#><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0><-#> shows that their lives are continuous<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>, miserable, and repetitive, which inturn conveys th

e theme of cycle of life. It is therefore clear that the theme of cycle of life conveyed is universal as these emotions experienced by the nomads can be felt and experience by all Mankind.

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#1440,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> Dawe and Wright have conveyed the themes

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>of the lives of nomads<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> and cycle of life through the structure<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of the poem, which is a visual stimulus<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>

and has more impact. The themes are <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>also conveyed through the tone<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>, and through the language of their writing<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>, such as the selecti

on of words used in the poem, the sentence length, symbolic of long hard days, and repetitive<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> elements to allow the poem itself to represent a cycle which indirectly reflects of the cycle of life.<-">

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#3168,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> The theme of <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>contrasting of the old world to the new world<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> in Remittance Man, is similar<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> to the

theme in Drifters, <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>no permanent place<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>. These themes are universal<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> because<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> their activity<-">

<:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> involves moving from place, which all men and women can relate to. The theme is conveyed

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>through poetic techniques, such as the use of imagery and sound words. In

<+#>Remittance Man<-#>, the spendthrift<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> has been sent to Australia from England, his new home contrasted to England is more open, unlike England, where the spendthrift had lived an asphyxiating life in England. This

is evident in the image of "Blue blowing smoke of twigs from the noon fire". As blue smoke represents a cold image, the image produced is negative, and the cold contrasted to the noon fire, is definitely<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> clear that

the spendthrift had lived a deluded life. His family gave him warmth, "noon fire", but when he committed one mistake, his family were cold, and discarded and disinherited him. Contrasting the old world, England, with the new world, Australia is described s

ymbolically as,

<[email protected]><:S+-1><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>" red blowing dust of roads where the teams go slow". This imagery shows the slow nature and easy pace of the lifestyle<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> in Australia. In the spendthrift's perspective, his permanent

expedition to Australia, had enhanced his life<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>, and Australia was a much more calmer country, as illustrated in the "slow dust", which conveys a slow, soothing image. As much as the spendthrift suffers from wanderi

ng alone, and the sympathy it creates and the memories of his past, these emotions and reminiscence<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> play a vital role of creating a vivid and universal event, which reflects the

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>theme contrast of the old world to the new world<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>being universal.<-"><:f>

<[email protected]><:S+-1><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> In <+#>Drifters<-#>, imagery is used to convey of the futile, and misery<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> in moving. Dawe has used the significance of nature to represent his contrast and symbolism of the family.

The tomatoes being green are not even allowed time to ripe, and have to be picked from its vine, the home of the tomato. The tomatoes and the vines are a contrast between nature and humans, in that the family have to move from their home, before anything ha

s been achieved. Sometimes, the frustration<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of "no permanent place" can bee seen as the moving to a new place is so fast, that even items from previous transportation<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> have n

ot been unpacked yet, "bottling - set she never unpacked".<:f><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0><-#> Another imagery contrast Dawe has used involved nature once again, the berries. When the family first arrived at their new home, the berries were bright, a ver

y bright and glamorous<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> image. The alliteration used by Dawe, "<+#>b<-#>right with

<+#>b<-#>erries", produces a tone of enlightening, hope, and happiness. Happiness<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>, Bitterness, and misery<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> are emotions experienced by all Mankind and is why the theme of cyc

le of life is universal.<-"><:f>

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#1440,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> It is therefore clear in the theme of contrast of the old world to the new world, and the<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> theme of no permanent place, are similar and are both universal themes. The<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>

emotions and events experienced through moving is futile, restless, uneasy, and moving

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>meant the transfer<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> to a place where new friends would have to be made, or otherwise, a life of individualism<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> would have to be lived

, just as the life<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> of the spendthrift had lived.<-"><:f><-#>

<[email protected]><:s><:S+-1><:#3168,9639><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> In the poems <+#>Remittance Man<-#>, and

<-"><+"><+#>Drifters<-#><-"><+">, it can be evident that the themes it conveys are universal. The most vital aspect of universality in the themes<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>, is the emotions<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> which Mank

ind can relate to. The important aspect of conveying universal themes, is that the poems are more understandable<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> and more easily related to, creating vividness in the emotions and setting of the poems. The

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>themes are conveyed through the language<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>, the tone incorporated in the poem, the imagery and sound each poets have used with in their poems. These poetic techniques enhance

and recreate a vivid event, and convey the themes across. The universal themes,

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>the <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>lives of individual nomads,

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>cycle of life<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>,

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>and contrasting of the old world to the new world in Remittance Man, and

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>the <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>lives of nomadic families,<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> cycle of life,

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>and no permanent place<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> in Drifters, are successfully conveyed through the poetic techniques each poet has used, the structure<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>, and

the language<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> which they have chosen to write in.

<[email protected]><:S+-1><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> A rhetorical question to ask one self is that

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>in<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>

<+#>Remittance Man<-#>, <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>the spendthrift was sent to Australia to close an embarrassing<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> chapter<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> in the

<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>family's history,<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> but isn't it ironic that discarding a family member out of the family tree to protect the family's reputation also an embarrassing event, which in turn onl

y adds<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> a second <-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0>embarrassing<-"><:f><+"><:f240,2Times New Roman,0,0,0> chapter to the family's history?<-"><:f>

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